Published On: Sat, May 30th, 2015

India’s Conquest of England: Hindus put David Cameron as the PM

In what was a historic swing never seen before in a British parliamentary election, the country’s ethnic minority communities including the enormous Hindu population played the king maker that saw David Cameron become PM for the second time

Cameron had said “When I look at the Ramayana and my understanding of the Hindu religion, there’s so much that you have to say about the importance of family, about the importance of community, about the importance of voluntary service – these are all the values that our country needs more of. So, as you celebrate your values, let’s make them our values, and let’s have more of them in Britain.”

Prime Minister David Cameron takes part in a ceremony at the Hindu temple Shri Swaminarayan Mandir in London, during Diwali.

Prime Minister David Cameron takes part in a ceremony at the Hindu temple Shri Swaminarayan Mandir in London, during Diwali.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/world/uk/Hindus-and-Indians-put-Cameron-back-into-10-Downing-Street/articleshow/47419494.cms

LONDON: Up to a million ethnic minority votes helped put David Cameron back into Downing Street.
In what was a historic swing never seen before in a British parliamentary election, the country’s ethnic minority communities including the enormous Indian population played the king maker that saw Cameron become PM for the second time with a clear majority, embarrassing every known election pundit, all of whom had predicted a hung parliament.
Cameron’s visits to Indian temples and promises of giving the country its first PM of Asian origin in the near future reaped rich results.
The first post-election analysis reveals that 1 in every 3 of ethnic minority voters supported the Conservatives in 2015, a stronger result than ever before for the party which has historically struggled to appeal to non-white voters. With 3 million ethnic minority voters taking part in the election, the results equate to the Conservatives securing one million ethnic minority votes for the first time in the party’s history.
Around 49% of the Hindu votes went to the Conservative Party while 41% went to Labour.
Cameron had worked hard in drawing the Hindu vote. He visited the Swaminarayan temple at Neasden and accorded it the same status as the Stonehenge and the Big Ben.
He promised that if he returns as PM, he would pay a visit to the Akshardham temple in Delhi. He also said that Britain needs to take inspiration from Hinduism if it wants to become better.
He had said “When I look at the Ramayana and my understanding of the Hindu religion, there’s so much that you have to say about the importance of family, about the importance of community, about the importance of voluntary service – these are all the values that our country needs more of. So, as you celebrate your values, let’s make them our values, and let’s have more of them in Britain.”
The organization British Future said “When translated into votes, based on an estimated 3 million ethnic minority voters taking part in the election, the results equate to 1.6 million votes for Labour, with the Conservatives securing one million ethnic minority votes for the first time in the party’s history. The Lib Dems and Greens secured 160,000 and 150,000 ethnic minority votes respectively, with UKIP on 60,000. The results are especially encouraging for Cameron’s Conservatives, showing that the party is closing the gap on Labour with ethnic minority voters, particularly British Asians and those in the South of England.”
With approximately one in 10 voters being non-white, the House of Commons too has now started to open up to a diverse reality.
Four black and Asian parliamentarians became the first post-war ethnic minority MPs in 1987 as it took four general elections over a period of 18 years for the number to increase to 15 by 2005.
A record number of ethnic minority MPs have been elected to the House of Commons post the May 2015 general election – 41 non-white MPs compared to 27 in 2010.
All 27 ethnic minority MPs in the last parliament stood again at this election with 25 retaining their seats. Labour retains its lead in the House of Commons overall, with 23 non-white MPs to the Conservatives’ 17 according to British Future’s analysis.
Sikhs too voted heavily for the Conservatives (49%).